August292014

Friday Freebie #39 Before Midnight (Blood Prince #1) by Jennifer Blackstream

Friday Freebie #39 Before Midnight (Blood Prince #1) by Jennifer Blackstream

This week I have for you a werewolf/Cinderella retelling that is glaring incriminatingly unread from the depths of my Kindle.

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Loupe always dreamed of getting married. She yearned for a caring husband who would take her away from her servant-like existence at home with her stepmother and two stepsisters, a man who would love her forever. Those dreams ended the day she was bitten by a werewolf.…

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August282014

The Eagle 

"How can a piece of metal mean so much to you?"

"The eagle is not a piece of metal. The eagle is Rome."

(Source: itstimetokilltheturtle, via sophrosynic)

August272014
August252014
"What will men say of us when we are gone?”

"What will men say of us when we are gone?”

10AM
10AM

"There’s this horrible thing going on, which is the belittling of romance in epics, and I can’t stand it. You see, the difference between an epic romance and one in any other context is the likelihood that the characters will change each other. They teach each other. They fight each other, bait each other, love each other. They’re called epic for a reason. Maybe only one of them will survive, maybe neither of them will. Either way, they’re the stories that last thousands of years, yet people moan about them cluttering up the epics. Let me tell you something: history was built on epic love, from Ramses II and Nefertari, who signed the earliest known example of a peace treaty together, to Angus MacKintosh and Anne Farquharson, who fought on opposite sides in the 1745 Jacobite uprising. It’s not just for the female audience, and it’s not just to pass the Bechdel test. It’s because in the darkest and the hardest of times, people find each other, people hold on tight to each other, and what really matters in life very quickly becomes apparent. It’s a lesson those who belittle these romances should learn, actually: hoist your standard for love, fight to the death for love, and shut the heck up.”

"There’s this horrible thing going on, which is the belittling of romance in epics, and I can’t stand it. You see, the difference between an epic romance and one in any other context is the likelihood that the characters will change each other. They teach each other. They fight each other, bait each other, love each other. They’re called epic for a reason. Maybe only one of them will survive, maybe neither of them will. Either way, they’re the stories that last thousands of years, yet people moan about them cluttering up the epics. Let me tell you something: history was built on epic love, from Ramses II and Nefertari, who signed the earliest known example of a peace treaty together, to Angus MacKintosh and Anne Farquharson, who fought on opposite sides in the 1745 Jacobite uprising. It’s not just for the female audience, and it’s not just to pass the Bechdel test. It’s because in the darkest and the hardest of times, people find each other, people hold on tight to each other, and what really matters in life very quickly becomes apparent. It’s a lesson those who belittle these romances should learn, actually: hoist your standard for love, fight to the death for love, and shut the heck up.”

(Source: breakfastatharrywinston)

9AM
"This war will never be forgotten. Nor will the names that fight in it.”

"This war will never be forgotten. Nor will the names that fight in it.”

9AM
"All my life I have lived by a code. And the code is simple.”

"All my life I have lived by a code. And the code is simple.”

9AM
9AM

"On second thoughts, let’s not go to Erebor. It is a silly place."

Monty Python meets The Hobbit. I salute the maker of this GIFset with much bowing and fanfare.

(Source: thorinds, via ladyofthewhitetower)

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